April 20, 2024

Unilagsun

Serving the university community

Dean Shares Insights on Faculty Development, Student Advocacy

By Famose Blessing, Olamide Oshodi, Patricia Odedele and Daniel Nnamani

Professor Ilupeju Akanbi Mudashi, Dean of the Faculty of Arts.

The Dean of the Faculty of Arts and a Distinguished Professor in the Department of European Languages at the University of Lagos, Professor Ilupeju Akanbi Mudashi,  has passionately advocated for student welfare and empowerment within the educational system. 

He addressed the challenges students face, ranging from lecturers’ lackadaisical teaching attitudes to unconducive lecture environments and overpriced textbooks. Prof. Akanbi staunchly encouraged students to voice their grievances, saying, “If you don’t ask for what you aren’t entitled to, they won’t teach you anyhow.”

Highlighting the significance of accountability and respect in advocating for change, he advised that students follow a balanced approach, urging them to assert their rights assertively yet respectfully. “No lecturer can bully you. But don’t be rude. Be nice, greet everyone.” 

Further elaborating on the students’ predicaments, Akanbi acknowledged the challenges they faced within the school environment and shed light on issues concerning the learning environment, mandatory book purchases from specific authors, and other academic hurdles.

He passionately advocated for students to hold lecturers accountable for their actions and stressed the importance of maintaining a harmonious relationship while demanding better academic conditions. “You should always speak up whenever you are treated badly by the school system,” he insisted.

Additionally, the Prof highlighted internal initiatives for classroom renovations and repairs of students’ furniture. He emphasized, “The Faculty of Arts has been able to do all these and still plans to do more from our financial reserve.” Notably, these projects were financed through Alumni contributions and the registration fees of newly admitted students, amounting to #9000 per student.

Responding to reported discrepancies in student registration fees, Prof. Akanbi clarified, “The #9000 was meant for faculty registration while the balance stood as payment for faculty vests, brochures, textbooks, and other compulsory manuals.” He expressed uncertainty about the university issuing receipts for the reduced amount yet confirmed the proper allocation of funds for essential student materials.

Prof. Akanbi’s emphasis on transparency, accountability, and the promotion of student rights underscores his commitment to an educational system that prioritizes fairness and student welfare. His proactive approach seeks to empower students to navigate challenges and advocate for their rights within the university ecosystem.

About Author